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Friday, April 13, 2007

Yglesias' omissions:

Matthew has a good post taking down Charles Krauthammer's latest Rah-Rah! column on how things are looking up in Iraq and that there is still domestic support for the mission. But he focuses only on one aspect, the "turning the corner" cliche.

What Krauthammer also brought into the mix was:
  • Fouad Ajami's point of view. Ajami has been a long-time supporter of the war and Bush. Yet here, the best Krauthammer can get out of him is that Ajami is "guardedly optimistic". Let the word go out ...

  • A favorite of conservatives, the line:
    ... if the electorate was sending an unconflicted message about withdrawal, how did the most uncompromising supporter of the war, Sen. Joe Lieberman, win handily in one of the most liberal states in the country?
    That argument has been used by McCain in recent weeks. But it's bogus. A truer statement would be:
    ... if the electorate was sending an unconflicted message about withdrawal, how did the most uncompromising supporter of the war now, long time incumbent Sen. Joe Lieberman, win handily last year when he presenting a decidely mixed view on Iraq in one of the most liberal states in the country against a political neophyte and in a year where no Democrat incumbent lost with hefty support of conservatives and the Republican party?
    Which answers itself.


2 comments

I still say Connecticut has a lot to answer for.

By Anonymous Rockie the Dog, at 4/13/2007 1:26 PM  

VIDEO: Don't Let Them Trick Us into Another War
"A near-meltdown seems to be imminent over Iran and its nuclear programmes. Before 1979, when the Shah was in power, Washington strongly supported these programmes. Today the standard claim is that Iran has no need for nuclear power, and therefore must be pursuing a secret weapons programme. "For a major oil producer such as Iran, nuclear energy is a wasteful use of resources," Henry Kissinger wrote in the Washington Post last year.

Thirty years ago, however, when Kissinger was secretary of state for President Gerald Ford, he held that "introduction of nuclear power will both provide for the growing needs of Iran's economy and free remaining oil reserves for export or conversion to petrochemicals"."

By Blogger Tom, at 4/14/2007 5:53 AM  

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